Childrens First Home

Childrens First Home

Childrens first homes are becoming of increasing concern: getting that vital first foot on the ladder is steadily getting harder and harder.   Families who have taken the wise precaution of setting up Home Protection Plans already will have sound mechanisms in place to help, but for the majority that just is not the case.    The PR which follows should not to be considered an endorsement for the product (we are lawyers, not financial advisers!) but it does make an interesting contribution to the debate.

Funding Childrens First Homes

New research from Castle Trust reveals that 49% of parents who have or plan to contribute to their childrens first home, plan to raise money through cash savings. In order to keep pace with house price inflation (as measured by the Halifax House Price Index) over the past 10 years, a higher rate tax payer would have had to receive 4.3% gross AER on their cash savings and a basic rate tax payer would have needed 3.2% Gross AER. However, the Castle Trust analysis shows that the average return of the top five instant access savings accounts with a minimum of £1,000 or less is just 1.6% Gross AER.

Other findings include:

·        32% intend to raid their stock market related investments, and a quarter (26%) will use JISAs and Child Trust Funds

·        19% intend to cut back on certain aspects of their lifestyles in order to help their children on to the property ladder

·        The average contribution will be £16,300

·        73% don’t expect to get the money back    (wisely! Ed)

Castle Trust’s two investment products, the Growth and Income Housas, which are suitable for ISAs and Junior ISAs provide returns linked to and in excess of the Halifax House Price Index. Someone who invested in the Growth Housa when it was launched in October 1st 2012 for a ten year term  would have seen their money grow by 10.3% today.

PARENTS EMPTY SAVINGS ACCOUNTS TO HELP BUY CHILDRENS FIRST HOMES

·       The Castle Trust Growth Housa has delivered growth of between 7.6% and 10.3% since launch in October 2012

·       The Castle Trust Income Housa provides an annual income of between 2% and 3%, and since launch in October 2012, it has delivered growth of 6.0%

Half (49%) of parents, who have or plan to contribute to their children’s first home, plan to raise money to help their children buy their first property through cash savings, new research(1) from Castle Trust, the housing investment and equity loans provider, shows. However, its analysis reveals that to keep pace with the Halifax House Price Index over the past 10 years, a higher rate tax payer would have had to receive 4.3% gross AER on their cash savings to just match this rise.   The return for a basic rate tax payer would have needed to be 3.2% Gross AER.

Analysis by Castle Trust reveals that the average return of the top five instant access savings accounts, with a minimum investment of £1,000 or less, is 1.6% Gross AER.

In contrast to this, Castle Trust’s two investment products, the Growth and Income Housas, which are suitable for ISAs and Junior ISAs provide returns linked to and in excess of the Halifax House Price Index.  They can be taken out for terms of three, five or ten years.

The Growth Housa outperforms the Halifax House Price Index by between 25% and 70%, whether the index rises or falls, boosting any gains or reducing potential losses.   Someone who invested in the Growth Housa when it was launched on 1st October 2012 for a ten year term, would have seen their money grow by 10.3% today.

The value of the Income Housa tracks any rise or fall in the Halifax House Price Index and it also pays an annual income of between 2% and 3%, depending on the chosen term.

Childrens first homes

As well as using their cash savings, Castle Trust’s research also reveals that a third (32%) of the parents who have or plan to contribute to their children’s first home intend to raid their stock market-related investments, a quarter (26%) will use JISAs and Child Trust Funds, and one in five (19%) intend to cut back on certain aspects of their lifestyles in order to help their children on to the property ladder.

On average this contribution is likely to be £16,300, and three out of four (73%) don’t expect to get the money back.

 

Sean Oldfield, Chief Executive Officer, Castle Trust said: “Relying on savings accounts to help children build up their first deposit may be an uphill struggle with rates at an all-time low and unlikely to rise in the near future.

 

“Residential property is one of the most stable asset classes, and has historically delivered annual returns of about 6 per cent a year – which is comparable to equities, but with much greater stability.  We offer investors an accessible way to invest in housing, without the hassle and significant cost involved with buy-to-let, with no management fees and guaranteed returns in excess of the national housing index.”

 

Castle Trust’s two investment products, Growth and Income Housas, are suitable for ISAs and Junior ISAs. They provide returns linked to, and in excess of, the Halifax House Price Index and can be taken out for terms of three, five or ten years.

Future returns cannot be predicted and past performance is not an indicator of future performance, but if Housas had been available 10 years ago and £5,000 had been invested in a 10 Year Growth Housa, it would now be worth £7,423, equivalent to 4.0% a year.

Minimum investment is from just £1,000 and investments of up to £50,000 are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.

Childrens first homes.